Nipple solutions 3: pumping

bottleIn addition to using a nipple shield, both the health visitor and the NCT helpline lady suggested I try expressing milk and feeding it from a bottle, to give my nipples a bit of a rest. C’s response to the shield was not encouraging, so using a breast pump was really the only option I had left if I wanted to carry on. So far I’d just about been able to put up with the pain: if I gritted my teeth through the initial agony, the remainder of the feed was just about bearable. The sight of my nipples, however, was really quite perturbing. The open wound on the outside edge of one was so deep it looked as if the nipple were in danger of detaching. The psychological effects of seeing this type of damage were considerably worse than the pain. I could only assume it was getting worse with each feed, and therefore that I was mutilating myself further.

Despite the obvious arguments for using a pump, and possessing one that was bought before C even arrived, it took me another couple of days to get around to using it. I don’t know quite why I was so reticent, but I think it had something to do with feeling guilty and inadequate not being able to get it right on my own. The turning point was speaking to my friend Zara. It turned out that she’d had exactly the same problem – right down to the fissures in the same place – and had pumped to help with the healing. She’d also had the same feelings of guilt and inadequacy, but had come through the other side and said that it made a massive difference. I wasn’t going to get any extra points for prolonging the pain, so I should just get on with it.

Some women find expressing milk easier than others. The key is prompting the letdown reflex – after that getting milk out is reasonably straight forward. Without your baby actually suckling, however, letdown isn’t always that easy to initiate. Looking at a picture of your baby (or indeed your baby herself) is one way of getting the vital oxytocin flowing. The solution for me was pumping from the really mangled left hand side, while C fed from the slightly less injured right hand side. For about four days, I expressed on the left and fed on the right, feeding C the expressed milk in a bottle if she was still hungry.

Using the pump and feeding simultaneously gave me an interesting way to monitor the extent to which the expressing helped. I had the same injury on both sides (albeit not as badly on the right), but only used the pump on one. It definitely provided me with some relief – expressing was much less painful than feeding – and the nipple did heal eventually, but the right side also healed completely, without any intervention. The healing actually occurred slightly faster on the right hand side, although this might be expected, as the injury wasn’t quite so serious. It seemed that the midwife who told me that things would eventually improve of their own accord was right after all. I think the problem for me was caused by the fact that my nipples weren’t quite the right shape initially (for C’s mouth at any rate – I don’t know if it would be different with another baby) and the skin broke so they could be stretched into a better one. Certainly, they now look quite different to how they did originally – pointy where they were once quite flat. When they healed, extra skin grew over the fissures where they’d stretched, rather than the skin knitting together at the point where it was originally joined, providing further evidence that my nipples were simply going through a (very painful!) transitional process.

Although it seems that both nipples would probably have recovered of their own accord if I’d continued feeding C as normal, I would strongly recommend using a pump if your nipples are suffering. It really helps to relieve the pain, and if you plan to bottle feed later on (whether with expressed milk or formula), introducing it early (and continuing regularly) means you should meet less resistance later on. Even if you take into account the constant pump dismantling, sterilizing and constructing, it’s a win-win situation!